Academics

glossary



A Dictionary of Student Learning Assessment Terms

 

Artifact: The type of data or information collected, stored and evaluated by faculty for a course in order to demonstrate that a student has fulfilled the Graduation Standard for a Proficiency. Artifacts may consist of research papers, projects, film clips, recorded speeches, recitals, final examinations, scripts, compositions and other types of material.

Example: For the General Education Proficiency, “Oral Communication,” Speech #2 is recorded and evaluated in the course SPE 101, Fundamentals of Speech and Speech #6 in SPE 231, Public Speaking

Course: The specific course title and course ID number required for successful completion of a Proficiency in order to demonstrate that an Artifact has met the Graduation Standard.

Example: SPE 101, Fundamentals of Speech; MUS 511, Jazz Harmony 1

Graduation Standard: The requirements specified in order to fulfill a designated Proficiency. The Graduation Standard is written as the minimum level of performance necessary to satisfy the designated Proficiency.

Example: For “Oral Communication” the Graduation Standard is: “Prepare and deliver a well-organized, content-rich and articulate public presentation of several minutes duration”.

Portal A designated timeframe for a review of a student’s progress towards her/his intended degree. There are typically four portals in a degree program:

*Portal #1: Upon admission and enrollment at the College to ensure that the student has the requisite capabilities to complete a degree program successfully.

*Portal #2: Upon completion of one year of full-time enrollment at the College or of approximately 27 credit hours to ensure that the student is making satisfactory progress in a degree program.

*Portal #3: Upon completion of three years of full-time enrollment at the College or of approximately 87 credit hours to ensure, once again, that a student is making satisfactory progress in a degree program.

*Portal #4: Upon filing the Application for Graduation to ensure that the graduating student has or will have fulfilled all the Graduation Standards for all the required General Education and Degree Proficiencies.

Portfolio Template: The PASS-PORT listing of the Mission and Goals of a Degree Program. Also included in the Portfolio Template are all the required Proficiencies, Graduation Standards, Courses and Artifacts for the Degree Program. All matriculating undergraduate students receive the General Education Portfolio Template in addition to their applicable Degree Program Portfolio Template and Concentration Portfolio Template. Graduate student receive only the Degree Program Portfolio Template and, when appropriate, the Concentration Portfolio Template.

Example:

MUS.B. JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC 2010-2011

A. MISSION:
Through a common core of technical studies and a foundation for courses in a major area of concentration, the Mus.B. Program in Jazz/Commercial Music develops in students the knowledge, skills and dispositions required of professional musicians, including an integral approach to the study of harmony, melody, rhythm, counterpoint, instrumentation, texture and composition, and the development of proficiencies in writing skills, aural skills, music analysis and reading facility.

 

B. LEARNING GOALS & PERFORMANCE STANDARDS:
Graduates of the Mus.B. Program in Jazz/Commercial Music must demonstrate mastery in each of the seven Proficiencies listed below:

 

EAR TRAINING 2010-11
The Graduation Standard:
● Demonstrate advanced ear training through Level Four of the Five Towns College Ear Training Core as set forth in the Five Towns College Undergraduate Catalog, including training in the aural recognition and notation of diatonic intervals, simple and compound rhythms and harmonic materials, melodic phrases, triads, seventh and ninth chords, diatonic and chromatic chord progressions, melodies and harmonies, including modern chord progressions in the major and minor modes, the ability to transcribe contemporary popular music and to dictate two and three-part contrapuntal material.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:
● MUH 224 Ear Training 4

The Artifact is:
● The Final Examination (MUH 224)

HARMONY 2010-11
The Graduation Standard:
● Demonstrate the ability to conduct instrumental and choral ensembles, including score reading and analysis, appreciation of principles of orchestration, arranging, voice development, and choral arranging and the ability to organize effective rehearsals with emphasis on the selection of suitable music and preparation for public performance.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:
● MUS 212 Harmony 4

The Artifact is:
● The Final Examination (MUS 212)

KEYBOARDING 2010-11
The Graduation Standard:
● Demonstrate keyboard skills through Level Four of the Five Towns College Keyboard Skills Core as set forth in the Five Towns College Undergraduate Catalog, including those keyboard proficiencies necessary for the performance of melodies and harmonic progressions in the small and large positions, the playing and reading of accompaniments, hymns and folk songs, modulation and improvisation, reduction of scores and conducting from the keyboard.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:
● MUS 232 Keyboard Lab 4

The Artifact is:
● Course Work (MUS 232)

PERFORMANCE 2009-10
The Graduation Standard:
● Demonstrate the ability to publicly perform on a professional level a varied repertoire, embracing major artistic trends through Level Four as set forth in the Five Towns College Performance Ensemble Core and published in the Five Towns College Undergraduate Catalog.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:
● MUS 442 Senior Recital

The Artifact is:
● Jury Evaluation (MUS 442)

SIGHT SINGING 2009-10
The Graduation Standard:
● Demonstrate advanced training in the sight singing of music through Level Four of the Five Towns College Sight Singing Core as set forth in the Five Towns College Undergraduate Catalog, including the singing of intervals, melodic phrases and more complex melodies using syncopated rhythms; training in aural and visual perception of complex rhythmical, contrapuntal and melodic material; sight reading in the base and treble clefs with an emphasis on chromaticism; development of a sense of tonality and the ability to sing major, minor and modal scales, major and minor triads, diatonic, minor, dominant and major seventh chords.

The Learning Assessment is recorded in:
● MUS 222 Sight Singing 4

The Artifact is:
● The Final Examination (MUS 222)

 Proficiency: A specific skill, area of knowledge, ability, value or attitude designated by the faculty as a required competence for completion of a degree program or for General Education.

● Examples: “Oral Communication,” “Accounting,” “Acting,” “Cinematography,” “Knowledge of the Learner”

● Rubric: A classification system for evaluating a student’s performance on an Artifact; the classification consists of four ordered categories with designated numerical identities, a summary word to describe the category, and a standard written evaluation for the category. The standard Rubric used in the College’s SLAS to evaluate Artifacts is typically similar to the following Rubric employed for “Oral Communication:”

● “Unmarked” or “0:Student has either not taken the course with the relevant Artifact(s) or has been waived out of the intended course or is currently awaiting the evaluation of the submitted Artifact(s).

● “Unacceptable” or “1:Student has not demonstrated the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required to communicate orally by preparing public presentations that are organized and substantive. Student displays of oral communication skills are characterized by hesitation, either verbally or non-verbally, or a lack of appreciation for ethnic or gender issues, or may reveal weak inter and intra-personal oral communication skills.

● “Acceptable” or “2:” Student demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required to communicate orally by preparing public presentations that are organized and substantive. Student displays these abilities most of the time without hesitation both verbally and non-verbally, and such displays demonstrate an understanding of ethnic and gender issues, while also revealing inter and intra-personal oral communication skills.

● “Target” or “3:Student demonstrates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions required to consistently communicate orally by preparing and delivering well-organized, content-rich, and articulate public presentations. Student displays these abilities without hesitation both verbally and non-verbally, and such displays demonstrate sensitivity for ethic and gender diversity, while revealing strong inter and intra-personal oral communication skills.